Saving Life on Earth–Saving Biodiversity — GarryRogers Nature Conservation

Human Impact on Biodiversity Unaware of the consequences of its behavior, the growing human population is erasing sixty-five million of years of biodiversity recovery since the massive extinction that eliminated dinosaurs and most other species. This is without doubt the greatest issue of our time, perhaps of all time. In the article below, Quentin Wheeler […]

via Saving Life on Earth–Saving Biodiversity — GarryRogers Nature Conservation

Tuaregs, the nomads of Sahara and their camels, walks among soft sand dunes and low, warm sunlight in the late afternoon. They are looking for feeding ground for their camels during the night. Arakou, Niger, November 2006.

Hurrah! Another Incredible Role of camel; Conversion of dermal proteins to an antimicrobial agent for wound healing

Algerian camel

This research was conducted by a team of Algerian Scientists. The abstract of the scientific article is given below.

Abstract: The aim of this study was the conversion of the camelin dermal proteins as a natural product that has an antimicrobial power used for tissue repair and wound healing. After dehairing, fleshings, deliming the animal tissues (Camelin) and purification, we supplied and fixed the essential oils of Lavandula officinalis, Eucalyptus globules and Eugenia caryophyllata. The product obtained is a spongy material communicating with open voids between the fibers. With a light yellow color, it has a remarkable antibacterial power and a very strong inhibitory activity on all the bacterial strains tested whose average diameter of the inhibition zones exceeds 15mm. It is also characterized by a smell which can be aromatic, pleasant and spicy or fresh and spicy depending on the essential oil used.

camel in cholistan desert

The Desert’s Livestock Species Have Tremendous Potential for Milk Produciton

Cholistan is cradle of precious desert livestock breeds and camel is one of the core livestock. The famous Marrecha breed of camel and Cholistani cattle are the backbone of the desert economy and livelihood1. The Brela or Malgade with high yielding camel breed come to the desert after the monsoon. Brela

The interest of scientists and policy makers have been inclined in last few years and many interventions are introduced in the beautiful living desert of Cholistan. Contest for milk competetions are held almost each year and the main specie is the camel. The contest of this year was attended and reported by Dr Sajjad Khan (a well known international professor for animal breeds and breeding). I hereby copy his email to briefly tell about the milk contest and the livestock breeds participated.

Heartening story of Camel and Cholistani cattle

Dear All
In the gloomy scenario of recent camel article shared at dad-net regarding camels in Rajastan (India) we have a good news from across the border in Pakistan. Camel milk competition for this year concluded few days back and Maricha breed (known for racing and dance) is a new addition in the milk competitions as it produced 18.94 liters in 36hrs under natural conditions. Natural conditions include no concentrate, no massage and no injections of any sort and a sand-and-rain storm on day 2nd of the competition etc.  Brela breed (on the right) which is known as better milk producer gave 23.24 liters (in 36hrs). Less than our expectations, animals had traveled as far from as 72 hrs of walk before the competition. Pictures are from a national newspaper where Government is congratulating winners (and supporting camel keepers).Camel milk winners 2016.png
Another good news is that first time ever we had an exclusive Cholistani cattle show along with the camel show. Cholistani is parent breed of Sahiwal and probably hardiest of all the tropical breeds we have as it survives in Cholistani desert. First position went to a cow (among 62 competing) producing 30. 54 liters (cow on the right). Cholistani milk winners 2016.pngSecond position was secured by a cow from a government farm. For me the beauty competition was even more fabulous as Cholistani has all sort of colors and animals without makeups were still amazing. Picture of a young bull (4th position holder) is attached as its color is the most preferred color (black splashes on light background). It was a wonderful opportunity to be with my own people whom I had never met and learning how they survive in the harshest conditions. Temperature there may reach 52C in summer and of course no electricity.Cholistani bull beauty - 4th.jpg
Lets not despair, keep trying and I agree with many things pointed out by Dr Razik.
With Best regards
Sajjad”
Reference
1. https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/cholistanthe-future-food-basket-dr-abdul-raziq-kakar?trkSplashRedir=true&forceNoSplash=true

The Wise Naqa Camel and Lavish Holstein Cow

Holstein is a dairy queen among the cows and producing around 12,000 liters per lactation. Though its’ farming system (intensive) is objectionable in many features as; animal welfare, environment, energy, methane and carbon foot print etc. but satisfies the ever increasing desire of the milk consumers. Beside all discomforts, she is very generous and kind, consuming all her available (glucose) and reserve (fats) energy to produce more milk. She keeps her life on risk and experience deficiency/metabolic ailments in her shortened life. The scientists are agree that the higher yield of this generous cow has shortened the life span of Holstein.

camel milking
Camel milk let down is best in the presence of her calf

On the other hand Naqa (the milk producing camel is called as Naqa in its true habitat) is very wise in consuming and storing energy. In good days (when surplus feed available) she stores energy (fats) in her hump and re-use during the feed scarcity. Having been with the Naqa dairy (modern and intensive), I have experience that even the high yielding Naqa increases the feed conversion efficiency (during high milk yield period) to fulfill extraordinary energy demand and try to keep her stored fat intact (hump). An elder wise man whispered “she stores and uses energy judiciously to keep her body beautiful” as camel’s beauty lies in her hump.

It is a brain storming for you all. Enjoy the life, learn more and revolutionize your ideas.

cropped-camel-pic.jpg

Alarming Facts about Desertification, Drought and Catastrophes

drought 1

Be among the first to know  12 February 2016

Hot off the press!
A new analysis issued by the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) shows that 2015 – the hottest year on record – confirmed that weather and climate-related disasters now dominate disaster trends linked to natural hazards.

The analysis found that 98.6 million people were affected by disasters in 2015, and that climate – often aided by a strong El Niño phenomenon – was a factor in 92 per cent of those events.

2015 disaster facts and figures vs 2005-2014 averages

  • 32 major droughts recorded last year compared to an annual average of 15 over the previous decade.
  • Droughts affected 50.5 million people, well above the ten year average of 35.4 million.
  • Floods were in second place last year when 152 floods affected 27.5 million people and claimed 3,310 lives. This compares with the ten year average of 5,938 deaths and 85.1 million people affected.
  • Floods in India last year affected 16.4 million people.drought

Rising sea levels and sea surface temperatures were factors in a very active cyclone season in Asia and the Pacific which saw 37 cyclones and typhoons. Globally, there were:

  • 90 reported storms resulting in 996 deaths and affecting 10.6 million people. This compares with a ten year average of 17,778 deaths and 34.9 million people affected.

2015 was the hottest year on record and this contributed to a major loss of life from heatwaves, including a combined total of 7346 deaths: in France (3,275), India (2,248) and Pakistan (1,229).

  • Overall, 7,346 deaths were recorded and 1.2 million people were affected by extreme temperatures in 2015.
  • This compares with the ten year average of 7,232 deaths and 8.7 million affected.

Other statistics from 2015:

  • earthquakes and tsunamis killed 9,525 people (including Nepal) and affected 7.2 million;
  • landslides triggered by heavy rains, killed 1,369 people and affected 50,332;
  • wildfires took 66 lives and affected almost 495,000 people.

Read The press release  , have a look into the infographics on disaster trends  .The latest report, The Human Cost of Weather Related Disasters demonstrates that :

  • Drought affects Africa more than any other continent, with EM-DAT recording 136 events there between 1995 and 2015 (some41% of the global total), including 77 droughts in East Africa alone.
  • Since the first UN climate change conference (COP1) in 1995, 606,000 lives have been lost and 4.1 billion people have been injured, left homeless or in need of emergency assistance as a result of weather-related disasters.
  • Urbanization has significantly increased flood run-offs, while recurrent flooding of agricultural and, particularly in Asia, has taken a heavy toll in terms of lost production, food shortages and rural under-nutrition.flood

Reducing the size of drought-vulnerable populations should be a global priority over the next decade; better accounting systems for indirect deaths from drought are also required; these should be linked to early warning systems and response mechanisms in order to monitor the impacts of drought more comprehensively. Learn more from the International Disaster Database EM DAT

compost of camel manure

Camels’ Manure~From Waste to a Worthwhile Farming Agent

Camel dung is beautiful in its architecture, dry and odorless. Camels’ manure/dung is use as a fuel agent in many developing countries, especially among the pastoralists’ communities. It is ready to burn after a very few minutes and does not need to dry in sunshine for many days like cows’ dung. In small scaled farming system it is use both for fuel and organic fertilizer. In northeastern Balochistan and Southern Afghanistan, it is use as a fertilizer for Pomegranate and wine trees(personal communication).

camel dung

In Americas, the dung of new world’s camelid (Llama) is use to neutralize the acidic, metal-laden water through a highly unusual filter: llama droppings in Bolivia 1. It is very good agent for filtration because of its higher fiber contents.

On the other hand, camels’ manure is going waste in countries (its original habitat) with highest camel population per unit land mass area (Gulf countries) in the world. UAE, Bahrain and Qatar has the highest camel population on per unit land mass at global level, producing millions of tons of manure annually; all going waste. I only found one reference that BP use camels’ manure in Sharjah (UAE) for the decomposition of hydrocarbon leaked in the soil/water 2. Camels’ dung is use for Bio-Paper production in India but at a minor level.

P1020863

Based in UAE, here a common misperception is prevailing regarding camels’ dungs as; it has no value as fertilizer. This perception had made camels’ dung a valueless atom and it is a burden on camel breeders to properly dump. On contrary (research findings) camel dung has almost the same value as that of cow dung 3.

compost of camel manure.jpg
Here are some herbs and vegetables grown in composted camel manure with mulch in Australia

Camel dung decomposes faster than many others because of the diverse and stronger micro flora in camels’ rumen. Camel is therefore more efficient in nutrient recycling, making camels’ dung more useful for cropping and farming. Hoffmann and Muhammad revealed that camel dung is not differ from cow and other ruminants’ dung 4.

In conclusion, camels’ dung is untapped precious resource which is not properly utilized so far. The visionary and innovative opinion in Gulf countries, especially the UAE can bring silver sliding in the clouds and may find ways to use this precious resource for the agricultural development of the region. Also, the research institutes of the region should come forward to chalk out projects on the exploring true worth of camel dung.

compost of camel manure 1.jpg
Close view of the plants grown in the compost of camel dung

This piece of manuscript is the tip of the ice burg and brain storming to launch a discussion regarding this precious organic material. I hope to hear from different quarters and to find ways for its judicious use. The GAA of the FAO can be a great forum to address this issue.

Continue reading “Camels’ Manure~From Waste to a Worthwhile Farming Agent”

TEEB AgFood: Calculating the Real Price of Food

“In the face of a rapidly overheating climate, collapsing fisheries, degraded soil, depleted water resources, vanishing species, and other challenges directly related to agriculture, we can no longer afford to pursue a flawed accounting system.”

Go to the link for detail study of the article.

https://wordpress.com/read/post/feed/39553851/896750661

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Mariwal sheep grazing in grasslands of Luni area Loralai