All posts by raziqkakar

Working as Technical Manager Al Ain Dairy Camel Farm in UAE. Earlier working as the Prof. and Dean faculty of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lasbela University of Agriculture, Water and Marine Sciences Pakistan, the author has been working on thematic areas of research policy, turning camel from a beast of burden to a modern farm animal, extensive livestock Systems. Author is the head of the Society of Animal, Veterinary and Animal Scientists (SAVES) and Public Relation Officer of the International Society of Camelid Research and Development (ISOCARD). I have been the part of the efforts of the Desert Net International (DNI) as member of the Steering Committee. My focus area is the characterization, documentation and reporting of the indigenous livestock breeds and effort for recognition of the native genetic resources at policy levels. Biodiversity in the context of climate change and local communities is an important chapter of our thematic areas.

The Camel Journey~ Updates from USA

Originally posted on Natural Health with Camel Milk:

Camels were introduced in the United States in different time period for work and armies. Camels were landed in different coasts of the US and were used mainly for work. U. S. Army explorer of the American West, Major George H. Crossman, recommended to Congress in 1836 that the Army should experiment with the use of camels since the chief desert problem for the traditional military animals was lack of water and forage.  Camels could go longer without water than horses or mules.

http://www.desertusa.com/mag05/sep/camel.html

As the other parts of the developed world, the camel role as beast of burden was diminished in the U.S. also and was kept by hobbyist and conservationist people for years. In the recent past, the camel products, especially milk was explored by scientists and was considered as natural therapy for various complex health issues. A move to use camel milk was initiated around the world and this…

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Termites and desertification

Originally posted on DESERTIFICATION:

Photo credit: Google

Termite mound in Kruger park

Impending Desertification Prevented by Termites?? How Is It Done?

Paper Reviewed
Bonachela, J.A., Pringle, R.M., Sheffer, E., Coverdale, T.C., Guyton, J.A., Caylor, K.K., Levin, S.A. and Tarnita, C.E. 2015. Termite mounds can increase the robustness of dryland ecosystems to climatic change.

in Science 347: 651-655.

Introducing their intriguing study, Bonachela et al. (2015) note that in arid and semi-arid savannas and grasslands, plants facilitate neighbors by increasing water infiltration while competing for water with distant individuals, citing Rietkerk et al. (2002). And they go on to say that “reducing rainfall generates a predictable sequence of patterns with decreasing overall plant biomass,” going from over-dispersed gaps to “labyrinths, spots, and finally, barren desert,” which last transition, in their words, “is known as a ‘catastrophic shift,’ or sudden collapse to an un-vegetated state,” citing Rietkerk et al. (2004) and…

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Camel Milk is a Magic for Autistic Patients~A letter from Ram Prasath (India)

Originally posted on Natural Health with Camel Milk:

  • Dear Razir Sir,
    Thanks a lot for your kind hearted help, which made me, what seems to be a impossible to achieve considering the place where am living. Getting a camel milk to Southern part of India, Chennai from scorching Rajasthan, is a mighty task. Thanks Raziq sir, for providing me all possible inputs and continuous guidance. Am thanking Christina Adams who is the one first i contacted and, Hanwant singh Rathore and Ilse too for helping me supplying the camel milk, in a neatly packed way, so that milk doesnt get decompose. There are many significant changes in my kid after he starts taking camel milk. Currently he is taking pasteurized milk of 700ml+ daily and following are the improvements which we achieved.

    1) His unnecessary irritation has gone.
    2) His patience to wait for anything has increased considerably.
    3) His eye contact improved.
    4) His sleeping pattern has…

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Camel Journey ~ From its Original Habitat to Modern World

raziqkakar:

camel importance is increasing

Originally posted on Natural Health with Camel Milk:

Camel role is incredible in its cradle of domestication and its original habitats. In 19th Century some camels were transported to USA, Australia, and some other places for work and armies. After automobile revolution the role of camel as beast of burden was gradually diminished 1,2.

In Australia there are thousands of feral camels, now It’s estimated a million camels are roaming across Australian deserts unfortunately considered as beast. Government launches project to kill camel (considering as pest) and save the scarce water resources in the region 3. Many friends from Australia and other parts of the world (including author) raised voice to halt such killing and wasting such a unique resource . The camel activists gave many good arguments to save camel; a tool to adapt with the climate change and judiciously use of the scattered bushy vegetation of the region 4. Unfortunately there are many…

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Camel milk potential for South Australia

Originally posted on Natural Health with Camel Milk:

The camel milk is finding its way in the new world  (from sand dunes of Arabia to the western world) because of its hidden treasures of health promising ingredients. Traditionally used for complex and diverse diseases in its habitat, camel milk is now praising in the Western world both by modern families and the Scientists. New small and medium enterprises in USA (Oasis Camel Dairy) and EU (Holland) with the production of camel milk is emerging. The demand is very high and the owners (personal communication) received emails and phone calls from different places to ensure availability of this precious milk for their kids with Autism.

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Kenya’s dairy industry switches from cowsW to camels | Global Ideas

Originally posted on Natural Health with Camel Milk:

The cow is the most important farm animal in parts of Africa but climate change is threatening the existence of the animal. Recurring droughts and extreme heat are making cows unable to produce essential milk. Camel produces milk in harsh conditions where other farm animals are hard to survive. In Kenya, a group of farmers has found an alternative in camel milk.

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Unlike cows, camels can withstand long periods of extreme drought and still produce milk all year round. Some 200 women have already made the switch from cow to camel milk. The camel milk is healthier and pleasant in taste. The move has improved living conditions for many, especially because they are able to sell milk from their camels at a competitive price. For more go to http://www.dw.de/dw/0,,11487,00.htm

The link of the video tube reported by Deutsche Welle is available below.

with courtesy to DW

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ILRI contributes chapters in new book on One Health approach to sanitation and institutional research

Originally posted on ILRI Asia:

Researchers at the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) are among the authors of a new book on One Health: The theory and practice of integrated health approaches published by CABI in March 2015.

One Health book ILRI’s Hung Nguyen and Delia Grace are among the contributors to this book

Hung Nguyen, a scientist with ILRI’s Food Safety and Zoonoses (FSZ) who is also a joint appointee of Hanoi School of Public Health (HSPH) and the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (TPH), and Delia Grace, program leader of FSZ at ILRI, have co-written, with colleagues from research institutes in Vietnam and Switzerland, chapters on ‘One Health perspective for integrated human and animal sanitation and nutrient recycling’ and ‘Institutional research capacity development for integrated approaches in developing countries: An example from Vietnam’.

The publication, which emphasizes the role of One Health approaches in sanitation and capacity development in Vietnam, says One Health adds ‘value…

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